Computer Network Administrator

Course IDCourse NameInstructorRoom NumberTime
007COMPUTER NETWORK ADMISTRATOR---

COMPUTER NETWORK ADMISTRATOR

OBJECTIVE:

Computer networking is one of the fastest growing fields in the world. Organizations of all types and sizes rely on computer networking systems to connect employees and customers with applications and data across geographical boundaries. Tremendous career opportunities are created as the demands on networking systems and the people who manage them become continually more complex. Students with an interest in a rewarding career that offers the opportunity for extensive hands-on work with complex computer systems should consider a career in Computer Network Engineering. The program covers the operating systems and configurations of Windows 2000, and Sun Solaris. Add to that is the ability to configure Cisco Router.  The program will give a foundation to pursue certification as a Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE) and/or a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA), and/or a Sun Certified System Administrator (SCSA).

CAREERS:

Graduates of the program pursue careers such as Network Administrators, Network Engineers, Network Specialists, Computer Network Engineering Specialist, LAN Administrators, IT Engineers, Test Engineers, System Engineers, Desktop Support, Pre-sale Engineers, Data Analyst, IT Specialist, Help Desk Technician.

Prerequisite: Some PC knowledge

40 hours/week:  24 Weeks

20 hours/week: 48 Weeks

Units: 96 /  Clock Hours: 960

SEQUENCE OF COURSES:

E103, C210, C215, C216, C217, R101, UNIX: can be taken in any order

C218, C219: must finish C210, C215

COURSE NO. COURSE DESCRIPTION UNITS HOURS
C210 Configuring Windows (70-680) 7 70
C215 Configuring Windows Server Network infrastructure (70-642) 7 70
C216 Configuring Windows Server Active Directory (70-640) 7 70
C217 Configuring Windows Server application structure (70-643) 7 70
C218 Windows Server Enterprise Administrator (70-647) 7 70
C219 Configuring Microsoft Exchange Server (70-662) 7 70
E103 Managing and maintaining PC 14 140
R101 Routing and Switching (CCNA) 16 160
UNIX Unix and Linux 24 240

C210 – CONFIGURING WINDOWS (70-680)

Prerequisites: none

Goals:

This is an introductory course covers installing, upgrading, and migrating to Windows; configuring network connectivity, applications, and devices; implementing backup and recovery; configuring User Account Control (UAC), mobility options, and new features such as DirectAccess and BranchCache; and managing system updates.

Required textbooks: Configuring Windows 7 (Exam 70-680) latest edition by Ian Mclean and Orin Thomas

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. Install, migrate, or upgrade

     

    1. Perform a clean installation
    2. Upgrade to current Windows from previous versions of windows
    3. Migrate user profiles
  2. Configuring system images
  3. Capturing system images
  4. Managing virtual hard disk files
  5. Managing a system image before deployment using DISM WIM commands and mounting an image
  6. Deploying images
  7. Using device manager to view device information
  8. Managing disks
  9. Application compatibility
  10. Managing AppLocker and Software restriction policies
  11. Configuring IPv4
  12. Cofiguring IPv6
  13. Network configuration
  14. Managing Windows firewall
  15. Windows remote management
  16. Sharing resources
  17. Folder and file access
  18. Managing brachcache
  19. Managing user account control
  20. Windows Authentication and authorization
  21. Deploying system images
  22. Managing devices and disks
  23. Managing applications
  24. Network settings
  25. Windows firewall and remote management
  26. BranchCache and Resource Sharing
  27. Authentication and account control
  28. DirectAccess and VPN Connections
  29. Bitlocker and mobility options
  30. Windows update and Windows internet explorer
  31. Monitoring and performance
  32. Recovery and backup

Sequence of lessons: in that order listed above

C215 – CONFIGURING WINDOWS SERVER NETWORK INFRASTRUCTURE (70-642)

Prerequisites: none

Goals:

Students will learn to configure IPv4 and IPV6 addressing; deploy and configure DHCP servers, DNS servers, and DNS zones; Implement IPsec, Windows firewall, and network access protection (NAP); plan and manage Windows Server update services; Manage file and print services in Windows server; Enable remote and wireless access, including DirectAccess; and monitor and troubleshoot network performance.

Required textbooks: Configuring Windows Server Network Infrastructure (70-642)  by Tony Northrup and J.C. Mackin

Learning Objectives:

Will cover the following

  1. Understanding and configuring TCP/IP
  2. Configuring name resolution
  3. Configuring a DNS zone infrastructure
  4. Creating a DHCP infrastructure
  5. Configuring IP Routing
  6. Protecting network traffic with IPsec
  7. Connecting to networks
  8. Configuring Windows firewall and network access protection
  9. Managing software updates
  10. Monitoring computers
  11. Managing files
  12. Managing printers

Sequence of lessons: in that order listed above

216 – Configuring Windows Server Active Directory (70-640)

Prerequisites: C210

Course Description:

You will be learning how to deploy or upgrade domain controllers, domains, and forests for Windows Server; manage user accounts and groups with Widows Powershell; Implement group policy, configure software and security settings; configure DNS settings and zones; manage authentication; plan and manage active directory replication; monitor and ensure availability of directory services

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. Creating an Active Directory domain
  2. Administering active directory domain services
  3. Administering user accounts
  4. Managing groups
  5. Configuring computer accounts
  6. Implementing a group policy infrastructure
  7. Managing enterprise security and configuration with group policy settings
  8. Improving the security of authentication in an AD DS Domain
  9. Integrating Domain Name System with AD DS
  10. Administering domain controllers
  11. Managing sites and active directory replication
  12. Managing multiple domains and forests
  13. Directory business continuity
  14. Active directory lightweight directory services
  15. Active directory certificate services and public key infrastructures
  16. Active directory rights management services
  17. Active directory federation services

C217 – CONFIGURING WINDOWS SERVER APPLICATIONS INFRASTRUCTURE (70-643)

Goals:

This course focuses mastering the skills and experience measured by these objectives: deploying servers, configuring remote desktop services, configuring a web services infrastructure, configuring network application services

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. Implementing and configuring a Windows deployment infrastructure
  2. Configuring server storage and clusters
  3. Installing and configuring remote desktop services
  4. Configuring and managing a remote desktop infrastructure
  5. Installing and configuring web applications
  6. Managing web server security
  7. Configuring FTP and SMTP services
  8. Configuring Windows media services
  9. Configuring Microsoft Sharepoint foundation

C218 – WINDOWS SERVER ENTERPRISE ADMINISTRATOR (70-647)

Prerequisites: C210, C215

Goals:

You will learn how to do the following: plan network and application services; design core identity and access management components; design support identity and access management components; and design for business continuity and data availability.

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. Planning name resolution and internet protocol addressing
  2. Designing active directory domain services
  3. Planning migrations, trusts, and interoperability
  4. Designing active directory administration and group policy strategy
  5. Designing a network access strategy
  6. Design a branch office deployment
  7. Designing remote desktop services and application deployment
  8. Designing virtualization
  9. Designing solutions for data sharing, data security, and business continuity
  10. Planning and designing a public key infrastructure
  11. Designing software update infrastructure and managing compliance

C219 – CONFIGURING MICROSOFT EXCHANGE SERVER (70-662)

Prerequisites: C210, C215

Goals:

After taking this hands-on course, you will be able to install Exchange servers; configuring Exchange recipients and public folders, client access (including Microsoft® Outlook® Web Access), and message transport; monitoring databases, mail flow, and connectivity; generating reports; implementing high availability and recovery; and, configuring message compliance and security.

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. Installing Exchange Server

     

    1. Configure the environment for Exchange server
    2. Configure the server to host
    3. Configure server roles and features for exchange
  2. Exchange databases and address lists
  3. Exchange mailboxes
  4. Mailbox configuration
  5. Resources and shared mailboxes
  6. Managing recipients and distribution groups
  7. Setting up public folders
  8. IMAP, POP and Microsoft ActiveSync
  9. Outlook Anywhere and RPC clients
  10. OWA
  11. Distribution groups and public folders
  12. Configuring client access
  13. Hub transport servers
  14. Edge transport servers
  15. Monitoring Exchange Databases
  16. Monitoring mail flow
  17. Federated sharing and role based access control
  18. Routing and transport rules
  19. Configuring transport servers
  20. Managing database availability groups
  21. High available public folders
  22. High availability for other exchange roles
  23. Backup and Recover Exchange data
  24. Recovering exchange roles
  25. Monitoring Exchange Server
  26. Logging and reports
  27. Managing records and compliance
  28. Message integrity, antivirus, and anti-spam
  29. Exchange high-availability solutions
  30. Exchange disaster recovery

E103 – MANAGING AND MAINTAINING PC

Prerequisite: None

Goal:

This course emphasizes system hardware, operating system theory, diagnostics, repairs and upgrades of IBM PC. Topics include: hardware configuration, software diagnostics, maintenance procedures, memory upgrade, floppy and hard disk installation and set up, ROM-BIOS software, bus structures, hard ware devices and troubleshooting. This course takes you from being an end user of your computer to becoming a PC support technician.

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. First look at computer parts and tools

     

    1. What’s inside the case
    2. Protecting yourself and the equipment
    3. Tools used by a PC repair technician
  2. Working inside a computer
  3. How to work inside a computer case
  4. Cooling methods and devices
  5. Using windows
  6. Quick and easy windows support tools
  7. Motherboard types and features
  8. Configuring a motherboard
  9. Maintaining a motherboard
  10. Installing and replacing a motherboard
  11. Types and characteristics of processors
  12. Selecting and installing a processor
  13. Memory technologies
  14. How to upgrade memory
  15. Hard drive technologies and interface standards
  16. How to select and install hard drives
  17. About tape drives and floppy drives
  18. How to plan a windows installation
  19. Installing windows
  20. What to do after Windows installation
  21. Special concerns when working in a large enterprise
  22. Basic principles for supporting devices
  23. Customizing computer systems
  24. Installing I/O peripherals devices
  25. Installing and configuring adapter cards
  26. Supporting the video subsystem
  27. Supporting
  28. Job roles and responsibilities
  29. What customers want: beyond technical know-how
  30. Planning for good service
  31. Dealing with prohibited content and activity
  32. Customizing computer systems
  33. Scheduled preventive maintenance
  34. Backup procedures
  35. Managing files, folders, and storage devices
  36. Regional and language settings
  37. Windows utilities and tools to support the OS
  38. Improving windows performance
  39. Manually removing software
  40. Overview of Windows troubleshooting tools
  41. Strategies to troubleshoot any computer problem
  42. Troubleshooting blue screen errors and improper shutdowns
  43. Troubleshooting applications
  44. How to approach a hardware problem
  45. Troubleshooting the electrical system
  46. Troubleshooting POST before video is active
  47. Troubleshooting error messages during the boot
  48. Troubleshooting the motherboard, processor, and RAM
  49. Troubleshooting hard drives
  50. Troubleshooting monitors and video
  51. Protecting a computer and the environment
  52. Understanding the boot process
  53. Windows / Vista tools for solving startup problems
  54. Setting up and troubleshooting network wiring
  55. Understanding TCP/IP and windows networking
  56. Connecting a computer to a network
  57. Setting up a multifunction router for a SOHO network
  58. Network types and topologies           
  59. Hardware used by local networks
  60. Setting up and troubleshooting network wiring
  61. Supporting client/server applications
  62. Controlling access to folders and files
  63. Troubleshooting network connections
  64. Securing a windows workstation
  65. Additional methods to protect resources
  66. Dealing with malicious software
  67. Special considerations when supporting notebooks
  68. Maintaining notebooks and notebook components
  69. Replacing and upgrading internal parts
  70. Troubleshooting notebooks
  71. Operating systems used on mobile devices
  72. Comparing mobile device hardware to laptops
  73. Configuring, syncing, and securing IOS devices
  74. Configuring, syncing, and securing android devices
  75. Virtualization basics
  76. Printer types and features
  77. Using windows to install, share, and manage printers
  78. Printer maintenance and upgrades
  79. Troubleshooting printers
  80. Introducing windows operating systems
  81. All about motherboards
  82. Supporting processors and upgrading memory
  83. Supporting hard drives
  84. Installing windows
  85. Supporting I/O and storage devices
  86. Satisfying customer needs
  87. Maintaining windows
  88. Optimizing windows
  89. Troubleshooting windows and applications
  90. Troubleshooting hardware problems
  91. Troubleshooting windows startup problems
  92. Connecting to and setting up a network
  93. Networking types devices, and cabling
  94. Windows resources on a network
  95. Security strategies
  96. Supporting notebooks
  97. Mobile devices and client-side virtualization
  98. Supporting printers

Sequence of lessons: in that order listed above

R101 – ROUTING AND SWITCHING (CCNA)

Prerequisites: E103

Goals:

If you want to succeed as a technical person in the networking industry at all, you need to know Cisco. Cisco has ridiculously high market share in the router and switch marketplace, with more than 80 percent market share in some markets. Students will learn to install, configure, and operate LAN, WAN, and dial access services for small networks (100 nodes or fewer), including but not limited to use of these protocols: IP, IGRP, IPX, Serial, AppleTalk, Frame Relay, IP RIP, VLANs, RIP, Ethernet, Access Lists.  The course also prepares the students for CCNA certificate Exam.

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. “Virtual LANs”, explains the concepts and configuration surrounding virtual LANs, including VLAN trunking and VLAN trunking protocol.
  2. Spanning tree protocol: dives deeply into the concepts behind the original spanning tree protocol, as well as the newer Rapid STP (RSTP), including concepts, configuration, and troubleshooting.
  3. Troubleshooting LAN switching: explains some general ideas about how to troubleshoot networking problems, with most of the chapter focusing on the forwarding process used by LAN switches.
  4. IP Routing: Static and connected routes, examines how routers add both static routes and connected routes to the routing table, while also reviewing the concepts behind how routers route, or forward, packets.
  5. Variable length subnet masks: defines VLSM and explains the common pitfalls that may occur when designing and deploying IP addresses when using different masks in the same network.
  6. Route summarization, examines the idea of manual route summarization, with which an engineer can make a router advertise a route for one larger subnet rather than multiple routes for many smaller subnets. It also discusses the idea of automatic route summarization at the boundaries between classful networks.
  7. Basic IP access control lists, examines how standard IP ACLs can filter packets based on the source IP address so that a router will not forward the packet.
  8. Advanced IP Access control lists, examines both named and numbered ACLs, emphasizing how extended IP ACLs can match packets based both source and destination IP address, and by matching source and destination TCP and UDP port numbers.
  9. Troubleshooting IP routing, shows a structured plan for how to isolate problems related to two hosts that should be able to send packets to each other, but cannot. The chapter also includes a variety of tips and tools for helping attack routing problems
  10. Routing protocol theory, explains the theory behind distance vector and link-state protocols
  11. OSPF, examines OSPF, including more detail about link-sate theory as implemented by OSPF, and OSPF configuration.
  12. EIGRP, include more detail about link-state theory as implemented by OSPF, and OSPF configuration.
  13. Troubleshooting routing protocols, explains some of the typical reasons why routing protocols fail to exchange routing information, showing specific examples of common problems with both OSPF and EIGRP
  14. Point-to-point WANS, reviews the basics of WANs and examines PPP, including CHAP, in more details
  15. Frame Relay Concepts, focuses on the terminology and theory behind the Frame Relay protocol, including the IP addressing options when using Frame Relay.
  16. Frame Relay Configuration, shows a variety of configuration options for Frame Relay, including both point-to-point and multipoint subinterfaces. It also explains how to best use show commands to isolate the root cause of common Frame Relay problems
  17. Virtual Private Networks, examines the concepts and protocols used to create secure VPNs over the Internet. This chapter includes the basics of IPsec.
  18. Network Address Translation, closely examines the concepts behind the depletion of the IPv4 address space, and how NAT, in particular the Port Address Translation (PAT) option, helps solve the problem. The chapter also shows how to configure NAT on routers using the IOS CLI.
  19. IP Version 6, introduces the basics of IPv6, including the 128-bit address format, OSPF and EIGRP support for IPv6, and basic native IPv6 configuration. It also introduces the concept of IPv6 tunneling and migration strategies.
  20. Final preparation, suggests a plan for final preparation after you have finished the core parts of the book.

Sequence of lessons: in that order listed above

UNIX – UNIX AND LINUX SYSTEM

Prerequisites: E103

Goals:

This course details best practices for every facet of system administration, including storage management, network design and administration, email, web hosting, scripting, software configuration management, performance analysis, Windows interoperability, virtualization, DNS, security, management of IT service organizations, and much more.

Learning objectives:

Upon finishing, you will learn

  1. Where to start

     

    1. Essential duties of the system administrator
    2. Suggested background
    3. Friction between Unix and Linux
    4. Linux distributions
    5. Example systems used in this book
    6. System-specific administration tools
    7. Notation and typographical conventions
    8. Man pages and other on-line documentation
    9. Other authoritative documentation
    10. Other sources of information
    11. Ways to find and install software
    12. System administration under duress
    13. Recommended reading
  2. Scripting and the shell
  3. Shell basics
  4. Bash scripting
  5. Regular expressions
  6. Perl programming
  7. Python scripting
  8. Scripting best practices
  9. Recommended reading
  10. Bootstrapping
  11. Booting PCs
  12. GRUB: the Gran Unified Boot loader
  13. Booting to single-user mode
  14. Working with startup scripts
  15. Booting Solaris
  16. Rebooting and shutting down
  17. Traditional UNIX access control
  18. Modern access control
  19. Real-world access control
  20. Pseudo-users other than root
  21. Components of process
  22. The life cycle of a process
  23. Signals, kill, send signals, process states, nice and renice, ps, dynamic monitoring, proc filesystem, strace, truss, runaway processes, recommended reading
  24. Pathnames, filesystem mounting and unmounting
  25. The organization of the file tree
  26. File types
  27. File attributes
  28. Access control lists
  29. The /etc/passwd file
  30. The /etc/shadow and /etc/security/passwd
  31. The /etc/group
  32. Adding users with useradd
  33. Adding users in buld with newusers (linux), removing users, disabling logins, managing users with system-specific tools
  34. Reducing risk with PAM
  35. Centralizing account management
  36. I just want to add a disk
  37. Storage hardware
  38. Storage hardware interfaces
  39. Peeling the onion: the software side of storage
  40. Attachment and low-level management of drives
  41. Disk partitioning
  42. RAID: redundant arrays of inexpensive disks
  43. Logical volume management
  44. Filesystems
  45. Storage area networking
  46. Cron: schedule commands, the format of crontab files, crontab management,
  47. Linux and Vixie-cron extensions, some common uses for cron
  48. Motherhood and apple pie
  49. Backup devices and media
  50. Saving space and time with incremental backups
  51. Setting up a backup regime with dump
  52. Dumping and restoring for upgrades
  53. Using other archiving programs
  54. Using multiple files on a single tape
  55. Finding log files
  56. Syslog: the system event logger
  57. AIX logging and error handling
  58. Logrotate: manage log files
  59. Condensing log files to useful information
  60. Installing Linux and OpenSolaris
  61. Managing packages for Unix
  62. Revision control
  63. Software localization and configuration
  64. Using configuration management tools
  65. Sharing software over NFS
  66. Kernel adaptation
  67. Drivers and device files
  68. Linux kernel configuration
  69. Solaris kernel configuration
  70. HP-UX kernel configuration
  71. Management of the AIX kernel
  72. Loadable kernel modules
  73. TCP/IP and its relationship
  74. Packet addressing
  75. IP addresses: the gory details
  76. Security issues
  77. PPP
  78. Basic network configuration
  79. System-specific network configuration
  80. Packet forwarding, routing daemons and routing protocols
  81. Routing strategy selection criteria
  82. Routing daemons
  83. Booting and shutting down
  84. DNS works, DNS for the impatient
  85. Name servers
  86. The DNS namespace
  87. Designing your DNS environment
  88. DNS database
  89. Introduction network file services
  90. The NFS approach
  91. Server-side NFS, client-side NFS
  92. Copying files around
  93. LDA, NIS
  94. Access control and rootly powers
  95. Network troubleshooting
  96. Ping, smokePing, traceroute, netstat
  97. Inspection of live interface activity
  98. Packet sniffers
  99. Network management protocols
  100. SNMP
  101. Controlling processes
  102. The filesystem
  103. Adding new users
  104. Chapter storage
  105. Periodic Processes
  106. Backups
  107. Syslog and log files
  108. Software installation and management
  109. Drivers and the kernel
  110. TCP/IP networking
  111. Routing
  112. Network hardware
  113. DNS: The domain name system
  114. The network file system
  115. Sharing system files
  116. Electronic mails
  117. Network management and debugging
  118. Security
  119. Web hosting
  120. Virtualization
  121. The X window system
  122. Printing
  123. Data center basics
  124. Green IT
  125. Performance analysis
  126. Cooperating with windows
  127. Serial devices and terminals